Austin tree service or a professional Austin arborist for information and assistance regarding the appropriate methods of disposal. '>

Official Policy for Disposing of Wood Affected by Oak Wilt

Oaks are a prominent species of tree in Austin, Texas. However, in recent years, a considerable number of oaks in Austin have been destroyed by the disease known as oak wilt. Oak wilt is caused by a fungus which causes the water-conducting vessels of the tree to become clogged. As a result, this prevents all parts of the stem beyond the blockage from receiving much needed water for continued viability. In an attempt to bring these devastating effects under control, the city of Austin has adopted an official policy regarding the appropriate disposal of wood affected by oak wilt.

Chipping or shredding the wood from trees affected by oak wilt is an acceptable means of disposal. This is permissible because the wood dries when chipped or shredded. The fungus responsible for causing oak wilt, also known as Ceratocystis fagacearum, cannot thrive once the drying process begins. Much like other types of fungi, which require moisture to thrive, once the source of the moisture is depleted, the fungi is destroyed. In spite of the demise of the tree, this is an environmentally friendly means of disposal, as the chipped or shredded wood can serve another purpose through use as mulch.

Another acceptable means of disposal of wood affected by oak wilt, although perhaps a little less environmentally friendly, is burning. Burning affected wood will kill the Ceratocystis fagacearum. Again, the heat from the fire supplies a means of drying, depriving the fungus of the moisture it requires for survival. And since the fungus is not spread through the smoke, there is no cause for concern that this manner of disposal might potentially affect healthy oaks.

As per the city’s policy, any affected wood that is not chipped, shredded or burned shall be disposed of at a landfill. An Austin tree trimming specialist who is familiar with Austin oak wilt and the various appropriate means of disposal of affected wood can likely direct you to the landfills in your area that are prepared to receive diseased oaks for disposal.

In instances where diseased oaks are identified, but are not accessible for chipping, shredding, or burning, the policy indicates that the tree shall be girdled. Girdling occurs when a ring of bark and underlying tissue are removed from around the tree, generally for purposes of destroying it. Once the diseased tree is girdled, it is then treated with an herbicide for desiccation (or drying). Desiccation, of course, facilitates the destruction of the fungus by depriving it of its life-sustaining moisture. This is an especially important procedure if the diseased tree is inaccessible, but happens to be within the vicinity of healthy trees, which could be negatively impacted if the diseased tree remains untreated. Contact an Austin tree care professional to assist you with such a procedure for affected oaks on your private property.

As per the city’s policy, one final, acceptable means of disposal of affected wood is through the use of firewood. This is yet another environmentally friendly means of recycling the wood. However, city policy indicates that the firewood shall not be stored near healthy, unaffected trees and shall be stored under a clear plastic covering with the edges tightly secured, perhaps dug into the ground, so as to prevent any spore-carrying insects from spreading the disease to surrounding healthy trees. The plastic covering also provides a solarizing effect, which speeds the drying of the wood should any moisture remain. The policy recommends the use of clear plastic so that escape holes are not easily recognized by the disease-spreading insects.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree service in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and oak wilt treatment. For more information on Austin tree service, please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

The Official Policy On the Prevention of Oak Wilt in Austin

The city of Austin, Texas contains many Live Oaks and variations of Red Oaks. However, in recent years, the city’s oaks have been heavily affected by oak wilt, a fungus-oriented disease, which causes the water-conducting vessels of the tree to become clogged and prevents all parts of the stem beyond the blockage from receiving much needed water for sustainability. Without the appropriate nutrients, the demise of the tree is inevitable. Unfortunately, oak wilt is also quite contagious. In an effort to help contain the continued spread of the disease, the city of Austin has developed an official policy regarding the prevention of trees affected by oak wilt.

Prevention begins with knowledge. Therefore, each city employee or contractor who works on any project in which the potential spread of oak wilt may exist receives and is required to read and understand the city’s official policy on the disease. Such employees and contractors may include project managers and equipment operators. The responsibility to provide a written copy of the city’s policy on oak wilt extends to individual city departments as well. If the possibility for the spread of the disease exists to any degree, then city departments are required to provide workers with the written policy before work commences.

Prevention policy also indicates that employees should avoid trimming or pruning oaks as much as possible from March 1st through June 1st. Austin tree trimming should only be completed during those times in which the city has deemed it safest to do so, which typically includes when the insect population responsible for transferring the fungus from tree to tree is most dormant or when the fungal spore production is minimal.

The city of Austin has also determined that any trimming or pruning wounds to oaks shall be treated immediately to prevent the spread of oak wilt. The use of a non-phytotoxic (not toxic to plants) wound dressing shall be used on injured oaks, including injuries to stumps and roots, both above ground and underground. Contact an Austin tree removal professional with your concerns if you suspect that the stump or roots of a tree on your personal property may be affected by oak wilt.

A final prevention policy requires the disinfecting of equipment used for pruning, sawing, or other required tools. This policy also speaks to the frequency with which disinfecting should occur and includes before work commences, work performed between individual trees, and before leaving a work site after work is completed. According to the city policy, acceptable forms of disinfectant are aerosol disinfectant or 10 percent bleach-water solution. Although current research does not support that doing so will prevent the transference of the disease, disinfecting of all equipment is a policy requirement of the city of Austin.

The city of Austin has established these preventative policies so that the substantial oak population within the city, whether on public or personal property, can thrive. The need for such policies shows not only the contagiousness and the extent of the widespread effects of oak wilt, but also the city’s resolve to bring the disease under control and, with time and effort, prevent it altogether. Oaks add value to the city of Austin, and the city values the oaks in return. If you live in Austin, are a homeowner with oaks growing on your property, and desire to be proactive with regard to the health and viability of your oak trees, just as the city has, contact and seek the expertise of an Austin tree care professional, who can assist you in this endeavor.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree service in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and oak wilt treatment. For more information on Austin tree service, please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Treating Oak Wilt

Oak trees are a valuable addition to any landscape in Austin. However, in the recent past, many of these majestic trees have succumbed to a disease known as oak wilt. This disease is responsible for the destruction of oaks by the thousands. Although there is no known cure for the disease, there are methods for treating it, which may prolong the life of the tree. Let’s examine some of the methods for oak wilt treatment.

One of the primary ways in which oak wilt is spread is through the root system. An infected tree can easily pass the disease along to a healthy tree through an interconnected root system. This may be prevented if a buffer is put into place. A buffer severs the interconnected root system, thereby protecting a healthy oak from an infected one. Recommendations for creating a barrier include establishing a trench at least 100 feet from the nearest oak wilt-infected tree. Using the appropriate machinery, the trench should be dug at least four feet deep and then backfilled.

Another primary way in which oak wilt is spread is through sap-feeding beetles. Because these insects are more active during specific times of the year in specific locations, pruning or mowing injuries, such as cuts or wounds, may make the perfect feeding place for the beetles and, consequently, the perfect place for infestation of the fungus that causes oak wilt. Consult an Austin tree trimming specialist with questions concerning the appropriate times to prune an oak.

Since oak wilt is caused by a fungus, treatment typically includes the use of a fungicide. The fungicide is applied to the trunk using one of two methods: macro-injection or micro-injection. The essential differences between these two methods are the amount of water used in conjunction with the fungicide and the size of the holes drilled into the tree for treatment. Macro-injection requires more water and more wounding to the oak, and micro-injection requires less water and less wounding to the oak. However, both treatments typically use the same amount of fungicide. An Austin tree care professional can address any questions you may have about which method of treatment is better for your oaks.

You may prevent oak wilt by immediately covering any cuts or wounds. This can be accomplished using a wound paint and is especially important during those times of the year when insect activity is increased. By applying wound paint, a barrier both covers the injury, as well as establishes a protective layer between the wound and the fungal spores beetles may carry. This protective barrier may prevent transmission of the disease through the open wound.

Finally, another protective measure that may be taken to prevent the spread of oak wilt is to carefully examine firewood. If the origin of the firewood or its condition is in question, research suggests that it is best to cover the wood with clear plastic and secure it by digging it into the ground, thereby preventing the spread of insects if there is an infestation. To provide better protection for localized healthy oaks, use the firewood the year it is harvested. The fire will destroy any remaining spores or insects. Additionally, for oaks that die during spring or the early part of summer, dieoff should be complete, and the firewood, therefore, able to be used, by fall.

Although oak wilt has become increasingly prevalent in Austin, there are actions which can be taken to treat it or perhaps prevent it altogether. Seek the expertise of an Austin tree service to assist you in effective prevention and treatment.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree service in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and oak wilt treatment. For more information on Austin tree service, please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Oak Wilt

Oak trees are one of the more popular and commonly planted landscaping trees. This great species is also a staple of the natural American landscape. However, oaks can easily succumb to a disease known as oak wilt. In recent years, this disease has destroyed a significant number of oaks in the Austin, Texas area. In order to prevent Austin oak wilt, it is important to understand the disease–its origin and how to treat it.

Although it is not the number one disease that kills oaks, oak wilt it is considered the most commonly known. It is caused by a fungus known as Ceratocystis fagacearum. The disease manifests itself through fungal spores that invade an oak and clog its water conducting system.

The disease is spread through two primary agents:

One is through beetles which feed on the sap of oaks. Beetles frequently carry oak wilt spores to non-infected oaks and introduce the pathogen through a fresh wound. The wounds may be caused by a number of factors, including wind damage or inappropriate trimming. However they may exist, wounds must be appropriately treated in order to decrease the chances that an oak will succumb to the effects of oak wilt.

Introduction of these spores by insects may also lead to the second agent frequently responsible for spreading the oak wilt. Once an oak is affected by fungal spores, the possibility for a continued, rapid spread of the disease to other oaks exists through an interconnected root system. Severing the root system of affected trees from other localized, unaffected trees is the only means by which to prevent the continued spread. Consult an Austin tree trimming professional to assist you with this, as he/she will possess the equipment necessary for such an undertaking.

There is no known cure for oak wilt, so prevention is key. For instance, there are specific times of year when pruning an oak is more ideal. Pruning during the extremely hot, dry summer months is beneficial, as there is a decreased spore production during this time period. Conversely, pruning during the extremely cold winter months is equally beneficial due to a reduced amount of insect activity. Additionally, should an oak have one, immediate treatment of a fresh wound may prevent spore contamination and preserve the life of the tree. This can be accomplished using pruning paint. Taking several, very achievable steps can lessen the chances that an oak becomes affected by the disease.

Oaks are a valuable landscaping commodity in Austin. Their value can be maintained through knowledge of oak wilt and some forethought of preventative care. However, if you still have questions concerning oak wilt, its appearance, effects, or treatment, contact an Austin tree care professional to assist you.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Austin tree service to assist you with your hardiness questions and concerns.'>

Tree Hardiness

When planning one’s landscape, many tend to first consider the various tree species from which to select. For most, personal preferences for aesthetic landscaping tree additions is at the forefront of their minds. A savvy researcher may also take other factors into consideration, including the size of the tree at maturity, the area required for unhindered growth of the root system, and how other objects near or within the landscape might affect safety. Another factor to consider before becoming absolutely set on a specific tree is whether or not that species can grow in a specific region. This is the premise behind a tree’s hardiness.

To understand whether or not a tree (or plant) will grow in a specific region, one must first understand how hardiness is determined. The United States and Canada are categorized into 11 areas whose average annual minimum temperatures are divided into 10 degree Fahrenheit increments. Consequently, the areas spanning two through 10 cover the United States and work their way in numeric order from north to south.

In order to select landscaping trees that will flourish, it is important to understand a tree’s hardiness and the zone in which one resides. For example, it is highly unlikely that a citrus tree would be able to flourish in hardiness zone four, where the average minimum temperature can drop as low as -25 degrees Fahrenheit. However, any number of variables can also affect a tree’s chances of survival. These variables include land formations capable of changing air flow patterns, protective barriers from harsh winter winds and temperatures, and mulching. Consult an Austin tree trimming specialist for pertinent information related to the hardiness zone specific to your area, as well as the species that will likely survive the elements there.

It’s also important to recognize that hardiness is innate to each tree, although levels of hardiness may vary greatly among the different species. This is particularly evident during trees’dormant period. Dormancy allows the tree a period of rest while still ensuring its viability during the often concurrent cold, winter months. Dormancy is especially important for the hardiness of flowering trees. Assuming that a flowering tree is planted in a hardiness zone capable of optimally supporting its growth, the dormant period generally allows for beautiful springtime blooms. If a flowering tree is planted in a hardiness zone incapable of optimally supporting its growth, then the period of dormancy (or rest) may not be fully apportioned and may result in the tree’s inability to bloom during spring.

To determine the most viable species of trees for your region, as well as to determine which hardiness zone is applicable to your region, consult an Austin tree care professional. He or she can be a most valuable resource as you plan your perfect landscape.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Understanding Tree Dormancy

Trees are a valuable asset to a landscape. Vigilance with regard to upkeep and maintenance ensure that they remain an asset. In order to sustain them, however, it is important to understand them. There are several stages of tree physiology, but perhaps one of the most relevant to understand is dormancy.

Dormancy is the process whereby a tree enters into an inactive state. This inactive state causes growth and development to slow or cease altogether. This is a natural survival mechanism, which allows a tree to survive adverse environmental conditions. In particular, these environmental conditions include the extreme temperature changes typically noted with the changing of autumn to the often frigid temperatures of winter. Although largely contingent upon geographic location, some purport that because of the often extreme change in temperatures from spring to summer, a dormant stage occurs during this time period, too, allowing trees to also survive extreme heat and any resulting drought conditions.

There are several factors that prompt dormancy, including plummeting temperatures, shortened days, and water supply.

Plummeting temperatures and shortened days routinely align with autumn (when trees begin to drop their leaves) and perhaps explain the general mindset that relates dormancy to the accompaniment of the onset of cold weather.

Likewise, a tree is innately prompted toward a dormant state when there is a decreased water supply. Since precipitation during the winter is frequently manifested in frozen form and water availability is, therefore, substantially decreased, a tree’s dormant state is a means by which survival is possible: If the availability of valuable water, necessary for viability, is limited, dormancy allows the tree to decrease its requirement for water. With this same concept in mind, certainly the insinuation of a dormant state during the summer months appears sensible. Extreme conditions are possible during the summer, too, and the innate will to survive remains, even if it is less frequently noted during a specific time. An Austin tree trimming specialist can address any questions regarding the widely accepted or disproved concept of dormancy during the summer months.

Other interesting facts about dormancy include the amount of time a tree remains dormant, which appears to be based on the species of tree and the geographic location. Some species require a longer period of dormancy than others. Consult an Austin tree removal professional with questions about trees specific to Austin and the amount of time each remains dormant. Additionally, if temperatures are unseasonably warmer than usual heading into autumn, then the onset of dormancy may be delayed. Conversely, preventative measures may be taken to help prolong dormancy. For example, covering a tree’s root system with mulch as a means to help winterize it may also extend the dormant stage.

Beneath the aesthetics of a landscaping tree lies a fascinating and relatively complex physiology. Understanding the overall functioning of a tree is a great first step to understanding how best to help it survive and thrive.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Austin tree service to help you protect your young trees from winter's frigid temperatures and winds.'>

Protecting Young Trees From Winter Freezing

After careful research and considerations regarding which tree to plant to enhance the beauty of your landscape, proper care is essential for maintaining the tree’s health and vitality. A part of proper tree care that may not immediately come to mind for many are the measures necessary to protect young trees from winter freezing. Conditions during the cold winter months can vary considerably from region to region, but cold snaps that include freezing temperatures or frosts are possible in any geographical location. Even when relatively warm temperatures begin to return during the spring, occasional cold snaps are possible. However, there are ways to protect your young trees when unseasonable or unexpected cold weather bears down on your region.

The greenhouse effect can be relatively easily and inexpensively replicated for landscaping trees by creating a miniature greenhouse. A miniature greenhouse provides a barrier against winter’s frigid temperatures and winds, encapsulating both warmth and protection. Create your own by first establishing a frame around the tree using wood or metal posts or PVC pipe. Then, cover the frame with plastic sheeting, a tarp, or another type of insulator. Secure the insulating cover using nails, staples, or by tying, whichever method is most appropriate for the materials used. Even if temperatures drop to potentially hazardous conditions at night, they may rise considerably during the daytime hours. This may be especially true during spring. Always bear in mind that, depending upon the temperature, the miniature greenhouse may need to be removed for a period of time so that the young tree does not swelter.

Consider protecting young trees by using thick cloths. Blankets, sheets, towels, or even burlap you may have on hand are excellent options. Depending upon the thickness of the cloth used, be certain the young tree is hefty enough to support its weight. If so, cover the tree’s branches with the items you wish to use or have on hand, and then wrap any excess around as much of the root as is possible. One potential drawback exists using this method of protection. Should any manner of precipitation, including drizzle, rain, or fog, followed by freezing temperatures, affect the region, the cloths may freeze to the tree. Consult an Austin tree trimming specialist with any questions or concerns you have if implementing this method.

If, after covering the branches of the tree, none of the covering items will reach the root, consider using mulch for added protection. Adding mulch to the root system provides insulation. You may even choose to use non-traditional and inexpensive types of mulch to achieve this. Perhaps you have residual compost from your summer garden or grass clippings from your summer lawn mowing. Perhaps you have a mound of leaves or pine needles from your fall raking. Even shredded paper can be recycled into mulch. Any number of items you may already have on hand may serve to protect your young tree’s roots and base during winter.

Because much forethought and care go into establishing an ideal landscape, be prepared to protect your young trees from the bitter cold that frequently accompanies winter. Contact an Austin tree removal professional to assist you with maintaining a healthy, viable tree during winter and beyond.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Protecting Tree Roots

The health of landscaping trees depends heavily on its ability to absorb life-sustaining nutrients, including sunlight and water. And since these nutrients are absorbed through a landscaping tree’s root system, this is one area of the tree’s physiology which shouldn’t be neglected. Unfortunately, however, the importance of a tree’s root system is quite often overlooked. If you want to ensure a tree’s survival and ability to flourish, the root system should always be considered. Let’s examine several ideas for maintaining the health of a tree through the protection and well-being of the roots.

In your effort to achieve and present a well-manicured lawn, always proceed with caution around landscaping trees. Because roots may extend for two to three times the size of the crown of the tree, there exists much room for error. You can lessen the chances for error, though, through awareness of any surface roots, their approximate length, and the area of the lawn into which they may extend. With this knowledge, you can be certain of the proximities in which to proceed with caution while using lawn equipment, such as lawn mowers, aerators, and trimmers. Careful use of such equipment may prevent root damage and, ultimately, may prevent damage to the tree.

Similarly, if new construction is scheduled for your property, protection of tree roots is quite important. This is because construction projects may cause soil compaction. Soil compaction prevents water and air from reaching tree roots. Without these necessary nutrients, the tree will eventually falter. The weight of construction equipment and the supplies used by construction companies, as well as the foot traffic, is quite cumbersome and can lead to the demise of your landscaping trees. Before construction begins on your property, invest in temporary fencing to surround the root system of your trees. Supplies, such as rope and stakes, can be purchased from a local home improvement store. An Austin tree trimming specialist can address any concerns you may have about avoiding soil compaction before construction begins on your property.

Another example of a means by which to protect a tree’s root system is through watering, particularly during the latter part of fall. As winter creeps in, the chances for freezing do as well. By taking the time to water trees during the fall, the roots will be able to soak in and reserve much needed nourishment before the harsh winter months bring frigid temperatures and winds, which tend to strip plants of their moisture. Since frozen ground can also cause damage to roots, watering during the early day is best, as this will help to prevent the damp ground from freezing over should temperatures cause an early freeze. It is best to water around the dripline, which is the area located directly under the outer circumference of the tree branches.

These are just a few examples of actions you can take to protect your tree roots and, consequently, your trees. Consult an Austin tree removal specialist for additional ideas to protect your tree roots.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Benefits of Winter Pruning

Although it may seem that spring and summer are the seasons when a lot of attention is paid to landscaping, winter can be quite beneficial to your landscaping goals as well. Harsh winter conditions may make for potentially unpleasant conditions in which to work, but the benefits from winter pruning are indeed noted.

Perhaps the most notable benefit of winter pruning is that trees are dormant during this time. Dormancy is a period in which there is no active growth of a plant in response to adverse conditions. Regarding trees, this is a means by which to survive the frequently adverse conditions brought on by winter, including snow or ice, frigid temperatures, and decreased precipitation. When a tree is pruned during the dormant season, the pruned areas tend to recover before new branch and leaf growth occurs in the spring. There is also less chance that the tree will wilt due to an excessive loss of water. This is because less water is needed and, therefore, lost when a tree is dormant.

The effects of winter pruning are frequently and especially visible when spring arrives. This is because pruning during the winter months fosters more vibrant springtime blooms from flowering trees, as well as more numerous and healthier fruits from fruit-bearing trees. Providing care to your trees during the winter can reap great benefits by springtime. An Austin tree trimming specialist can help you determine how best to prune your trees so that great results are achieved.

Another benefit of winter pruning is that by the time winter arrives, the tree has already lost its foliage. Without the leaves impeding view, determining which branches to prune becomes an easier process. When the crown of the tree is exposed, one can more easily determine which branches to remove or shorten. If present, dead branches can be more readily identified as such and removed from the tree. Of course, the likelihood of personal or property damage is lessened when dead braches are removed from a tree. Additionally, if proper care of pruning tools and equipment is taken, diseased branches can also be identified and removed. The chances of spreading the disease to other viable trees are decreased when pruning occurs during the winter months. Consult an Austin tree removal professional to help determine whether or not specific branches may need to be removed for the overall benefit of a tree.

There are considerable benefits to pruning your landscaping trees during the winter. With a little careful forethought and attention, there may be some spectacular results from all of your efforts when spring rolls around!

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

Austin tree trimming specialist to learn tips for selecting landscaping trees.'>

Tips for Selecting Landscaping Trees

Without a doubt, a well-planned landscape can add beauty and value to a home. And when it comes to planning one’s landscape, there are numerous species of trees from which to choose. While a large selection can certainly give the property owner an advantage, it’s also possible that it may, at times, also make selection of the right tree a daunting and overwhelming task. So, what are some basic considerations for selecting the landscaping trees for one’s property?

When selecting trees for your property, it’s important to first consider the size of the tree at maturity. Many trees may be quite eye-catching while they are small and growing in containers in the nursery. This initial appeal may be amplified for those trees that may have beautiful blooms. But what dimensions should be anticipated when the tree is fully grown? Is it a species known to be small or large? Sometimes homeowners fail to consider what the long-term growth implications may be for the trees they select. Always be certain to consider this important factor when selecting trees for your property.

It’s equally important to consider the overall size of the property. If the property is large, selecting trees that are too small may not help achieve any desired aesthetic effect the homeowner hopes to accomplish with the landscaping. The trees may appear to be scattered too few and far between. An inappropriately selected tree planted in the wrong location could potentially devalue the property. On the contrary, if the property is small, selecting one or more trees that grow to large dimensions at maturity may crowd the property (or that of a neighbor) at best or may cause structural damage at worst. Large trees that grow on small properties have potential to affect foundations, septic systems, rooftops, privacy fences, and more.

When selecting trees for one’s landscape, a property owner should also consider the purpose(s) of the tree. Is the addition of a tree purely aesthetic? Is it purely functional? Is it a combination? Certain trees lend themselves to specific purposes, and this may help the homeowner determine the best tree for their property. For instance, if the tree is strictly for beautification, a homeowner may select a tree that presents beautiful blooms, such as a dogwood or a crabapple, throughout the year. Perhaps the homeowner would like a tree that serves a functional purpose, such as a large oak planted strategically to either shade the home during the hot summer months or to block the harsh winter winds. Perhaps the homeowner would like a tree that is both aesthetically pleasing and functional, such as planting a maple to shelter the home and provide beautiful fall foliage, or an evergreen that also provides some manner of shelter to the home and provides beautiful color to the property during the often bleak winter months when deciduous trees have lost their once-colorful leaves. Consult an Austin tree trimming specialist to help determine the best species of trees suitable for the desired purposes.

These are just a few things to consider when selecting landscaping trees. There may be other considerations necessary for a homeowner to make. These may include average temperatures, precipitation, and soil conditions specific to the area of the country in which a homeowner lives. An Austin tree removal specialist can assist with this information, as well as assist with any additional questions or concerns a homeowner may have when it comes to selecting the right tree for the landscaping goals he or she hopes to achieve.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.