Landscaping Trees and Root Rot

A beautiful, well-maintained landscape adds value to a home or business. Creating a landscape as such is quite an investment, requiring considerable time, energy, and money for establishment and maintenance. In order to maintain this investment, it’s important to become aware of the signs of problems with landscaping trees. Recognizing signs of tree diseases can prompt much needed interventions, which may reverse or cure the tree’s ill. This article will examine one such tree disease–root rot.

Essentially, root rot is as it sounds. The root of a tree begins to rot. Root rot is an effect. So what, then, is the cause? Root rot may be caused by two issues, both a direct result of overwatering. One possible issue due to overwatering is an overall lack of oxygen, without which a tree cannot survive. Another possible issue resulting from overwatering occurs when a previously dormant fungus in the soil is activated and attacks the root. The fungus will eventually cause root rot and likely kill the tree.

If trees inexplicably exhibit wilted or discolored leaves, begin to lose leaves, especially external to autumn, or have an overall poor or unhealthy appearance, then there may be an onset of root rot. Increased chances for this may exist if these signs became present following an incident, or repeated incidents, of overwatering. Overwatering may be the result of an intentional effort to sustain the tree by a homeowner or business owner or may be the result of poor drainage by natural waterfall, such as rain. Whichever the case, damage may be done.

It’s also possible that root rot may impact trees whose roots have been damaged by mower blades or have otherwise been nicked in such a way that roots can be directly and negatively affected.

If conks are present on a tree, then root rot is also present. Conks are shelf-like fungi that grow as a result of and flourish when there are rotting or decaying roots. The presence of conks is also a reasonable measure by which root rot damage may be estimated. For instance, the more conks there are, the more sizeable they are, and the more tree circumference enveloped by them, the more severe the root decay.

If the root system or bark of the lower part of the tree trunk is dark-colored, easily removed, or friable, root rot is likely. This may be the most obvious sign of a problem with root rot. However, if you are still uncertain, contact an Austin tree trimming
specialist, who can provide expert guidance about the health of your landscaping trees.

Because prevention of root rot is the best way to maintain healthy landscaping trees, it is quite important to recognize the signs of it. However, if you have a tree that you believe is indeed suffering from root rot, you can contact Austin tree removal specialist, who can assist you with determining the best course of action, especially valuable information and assistance if removal of the tree is the best or only option. They can advise regarding chemical treatment of the soil. An Austin arborist can also effectively speak to measures you can take to avoid wounding the roots of a tree in order to prevent vulnerability. If you decide for aesthetical reasons to replant in the same vicinity as a previously affected tree, be certain to contact an Austin stump removal specialist. It is imperative that all of the stump and roots from a previously affected tree are properly removed to lessen the chances that a new landscaping tree will suffer the same fate.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree services in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and stump removal. For more information on Austin tree service please visit https://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

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