Tree Trimming to Avoid Storm Damage

Storms are inevitable, especially in certain geographical locations and during particular times of the year. Unfortunately, this is particularly true of the deep south, including Austin, Texas. Here, it is not uncommon for higher regional temperatures and moisture to often collide with cooler air sweeping in from the north. The results can be disastrous. Although there is nothing that can be done to prevent nature’s fury, there are steps that homeowner’s can take to prevent possible damage caused by downed trees and limbs sometimes resulting from storms.

First, it is important to examine your property. Look at locations of trees, particularly those that are high-standing. How proximal are they to important objects such as your home, a neighbor’s home, exposed vehicles, or power lines? Do any branches touch the roof of your home? If so, bear in mind that any high winds caused by storms could cause them to remove shingles and expose the rooftop to heavy rains and possible leaks. Another concern are weak branches that overhang your home. Such branches could easily fall on top of your home during periods of high winds and cause damage, too. Do you have trees near a property line which could fall on a neighbor’s property, including a fence, a vehicle, or their home?

If any one of these scenarios is possible, it is imperative that you seek the expertise of a professional who can advise you regarding trees that may be of concern during stormy weather. Certainly, employing the services of an Austin tree trimming professional can decrease the chances of damage to property, or more importantly life, when storms occur. Not only can a professional identify the strategic locations of possible damage, but he/she can also help to properly trim problem trees. Applying correct trimming techniques can also lessen chances of other kinds of damage to landscaping trees. Such non-storm-related damage may include exposure to Austin oak wilt or even the death of a tree.

Although the location of a tree relative to property is perhaps the most important indicator of possible damage, it’s also important to consider the location of a tree relative to other trees. It is entirely possible that one tree’s fall can lead to damage caused by that of another tree, very much like a domino effect. It is not impossible during the fury of a storm for a larger, weakened tree to drop sizeable limbs or collapse altogether onto a smaller, less hardy tree, which also happens to stand nearer to homes, outbuildings, or other types of property. Secondary damaging effects of a fall are possible.

Consider, too, that trees which stand proximal to other trees create density. Although aesthetically appealing, friendly to wildlife, or comfortable through the provision of shade, especially during southern summer heat, this can be equally as problematic. A fire-inducing lightning strike to one tree during a storm may cause surrounding trees to burn as well. Therefore, brush fire may become a concern secondary to storm damage.

Although nature cannot be controlled, there are certainly steps that can be taken to protect your investment in your property, including your home, vehicles, and landscaping trees. Being proactive in this regard may also help to protect a neighbor’s property and keep you free from any fiscal responsibility due to perceived or actual negligence. Contact an Austin tree care service for assistance.

About the Author: Andrew Johnson is the owner of Central Texas Tree Care, a leading provider of Austin tree service in Central Texas. Certified ISA Austin arborist services including: tree trimming, tree removal, tree care and oak wilt treatment. For more information on Austin tree service, please visit http://www.centraltexastreecare.com.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>